Register for Faculty on the Road Seminars

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Wednesday March 11
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
"To Catch a Thief: The Emerging Science of DNA Forensics" with Drew Cressman (Biology). Hosted by Wendy Fleishman '74 in Manhattan's Hudson Square (address will be shared upon registration). Since the mythical days of Sherlock Holmes, forensic science - the application of scientific principles and techniques to matters of criminal justice - has aided law enforcement as well as captured the public imagination. Television shows such as CSI have popularized more recent techniques, particularly the use of DNA analysis and the FBI's CODIS database to identify potential perpetrators, victims or other individuals. Beginning with the capture of California's infamous Golden State Killer two years ago, the field of DNA forensics has recently undergone dramatic innovations in genetic analysis and identification, embracing the use of genealogy websites such as Ancestry.com, enhancing specificity in DNA fingerprinting, and developing facial and physical profiles based on minimal DNA samples. In this talk, we'll discuss the scientific principles and techniques that form the basis of DNA forensics as well as the resulting limitations and implications regarding genetic privacy and suspect profiling.
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Tuesday March 24
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
"Writing the Occupation: French History in Literature" with Bella Brodzki '72 (Literature) and Jason Earle (French and Literature). No understanding of contemporary France is possible without examining the "Dark Years," the period of the German Occupation and the collaborationist Vichy Regime (1940-1944). Our seminar will focus on the personal and philosophical writings of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, both of whom experienced firsthand daily life in occupied Paris. Their framing accounts will enable us to reflect on the ethical, existential, and political choices demanded of artists and intellectuals during this time of collective anxiety and ambivalence. Assigned reading: Jean-Sartre, "Paris under the Occupation," and selections from Simone de Beauvoir, The Prime of Life (295-296, 348-368).
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Saturday March 28
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
"The Lexicon of Migration" with Parthiban Muniandy (Sociology). What does it mean to be a "temporary" person? The multiple discourses surrounding migrants, refugees, "illegals," and other non-native-born people often paint problematic, exaggerated, and frustratingly misunderstood portraits about entire communities and populations. We live in a world where almost 245 million people are living in a country other than where they were born and some 740 million people migrate internally, primarily from rural to urban centers, bringing the total number of migrants to more than one billion people. This seminar will focus on communities and groups of migrants who are often targeted as national "problems": refugees, undocumented persons, and so-called "economic" migrants. There will also be a brief update on the Consortium on Forced Migration, Displacement, and Education. This Consortium includes Sarah Lawrence, Vassar, Bard, and Bennington Colleges and is focused on the global refugee crisis.
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Saturday April 04
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
"Austen Inc.: Female Readers and Writers in Northanger Abbey" with James Horowitz (Literature). Early in Northanger Abbey, the novel she was revising at the time of her death in 1817, Jane Austen makes a remarkable but not implausible claim: that books by women had afforded more extensive and unaffected pleasure than those of any other literary corporation in the world. As Austen knew, it was only over the preceding century that British women had begun to publish en masse, reshaping the cultural landscape as poets, playwrights, historians, political commentators, and, perhaps most influentially, novelists. Our seminar in Boston, adapted from my courses at Sarah Lawrence on eighteenth-century female authorship, will focus on Northanger Abbey itself, an under-appreciated item in Austen's canon. There Austen reflects with her characteristic subtlety and incisive wit on the place of women in the literary marketplace: as writers, as readers, and as social subjects conditioned by the conventions of mass-market fiction, including Gothic novels.
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Event registration summary
Faculty on the Road in New York City with Drew Cressman:
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0
$0.00
Faculty on the Road in New York City with Bella Brodzki and Jason Earle:
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$0.00
Faculty on the Road in Washington DC with Parthiban Muniandy:
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$0.00
Faculty on the Road in Boston with James Horowitz:
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$0.00
Donation:
$0.00
Total:
$
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