Event Registration

Having trouble registering online? Please contact the Office of Alumni Relations at alum@sarahlawrence.edu.

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Monday March 8
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Join Dr. Heather Davis, Assistant Professor of Culture and Media at the New School for an exploration of the way plastic has transformed the material world due to its longevity and range, as it has also transformed our understandings and expectations of matter and materiality. This event is the first in our series presented by "The Sarah Lawrence Interdisciplinary Collaborative on the Environment." This talk is sponsored by the Dr. Lee MacCormick Edwards Charitable Foundation and is open to the entire Sarah Lawrence community. A zoom link will be sent to registrants within 24 hours of the event or emailvirtualevents@sarahlawrence.edu.
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Monday March 15
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Join faculty members Sarah Hamill (Art History), Michelle Hersh (Biology), Niko Higgins (Music), Marie Howe (Writing), Eric Leveau (French, Literature), An Li (Economics), Linwood Lewis (Psychology), Joshua Muldavin (geography), Bernice Rosenzweig (Environmental Science), Fiona Wilson (Literature), and Charles Zerner (Environmental Studies) for brief, lightning talks on their approach to teaching and research to address issues of Climate Justice. What perspectives and tools does each discipline bring to addressing the challenges of the climate crisis? This event is a part of our series presented by "The Sarah Lawrence Interdisciplinary Collaborative on the Environment" and is open to the entire Sarah Lawrence community. A zoom link will be sent to registrants within 24 hours of the event or email virtualevents@sarahlawrence.edu.
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Thursday March 25
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
As part of Sarah Lawrence's campus-wide Justice series, join recent MacArthur Fellow, Dr. Cristina Rivera Garza, in conversation with faculty members Una Chung (Global Studies, Media Studies, Women's History), Heather Cleary (Spanish), and Kate Zambreno (Writing) to discuss her recent collection, "Grieving: Dispatches from a Wounded Country," which explores Mexico's epidemic of disappearances and femicide. Working from and against this political context, Rivera Garza posits that collective grief is an act of dissent against state violence, and that writing is a powerful mode of seeking social justice and embodying resilience and care. Also a celebrated speculative fiction writer, Dr. Rivera Garza heads the creative writing program at the University of Houston. This event is open to the entire Sarah Lawrence community. A zoom link will be sent to registrants within 24 hours of the event or email alum@sarahlawrence.edu.
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Tuesday April 6
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM
A continuation of our SLC Faculty @ Home series, this mini-course will be led by Arnold Krupat, Faculty Emeritus. Prior to the several European invasions beginning in the seventeenth century, Native American literary expression was orally presented and preserved: indigenous Native Nations did not have an idiographic or phonetic alphabet. Literature--some have suggested the awkward term orature as a substitute--was a matter of speaker to listener, mouth to ear, and we will look at written versions of some of this. Although indigenous American peoples did not conceive of the "self" as Europe began to do in the late eighteenth century, autobiographical expression was, initially, solicited from Indians, and, in time, developed by them, and we will read some Native life-writing. A distinction between verse and prose is a matter of the printed page; but once Native people began to write they did indeed write poetry and fiction, and we will consider a sampling of both from--mostly--the second half of the twentieth century, concluding with the last novel by James Welch, called The Heartsong of Charging Elk (2000). Seminars will be held on the following Tuesdays at 5:30 PM Eastern Time: 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27, and 5/4. Space is limited. Registration is for all five-seminars. Seminars cannot be signed up for individually.
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$125.00
 
$200.00
 
Wednesday April 7
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
What does it mean to be a "temporary" person? The multiple discourses surrounding migrants, refugees, "illegals," and other non-native-born people often paint problematic, exaggerated, and frustratingly misunderstood portraits about entire communities and populations. We live in a world where almost 245 million people are living in a country other than where they were born and some 740 million people migrate internally, primarily from rural to urban centers, bringing the total number of migrants to more than one billion people. This seminar at 7:00 PM ET, will focus on communities and groups of migrants who are often targeted as national "problems": refugees, undocumented persons, and so-called "economic" migrants. There will also be a brief update on the Consortium on Forced Migration, Displacement, and Education which includes Sarah Lawrence, Vassar, Bard, and Bennington Colleges and is focused on the global refugee crisis. A zoom link will be sent to registrants within 24 hours of the event or email alum@sarahlawrence.edu.
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Thursday April 15
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Dr. Bettina L. Love is an award-winning author and the Athletic Association Endowed Professor at the University of Georgia. Dr. Love's talk will discuss the struggles and the possibilities of committing ourselves to an abolitionist goal of educational freedom and intersectional justice, so we all can move beyond what she calls the educational survival complex. Abolitionist Teaching is built on the creativity, imagination, boldness, ingenuity, and rebellious spirit and methods of abolitionists to demand and fight for an educational system and world where all students are thriving, not simply surviving. Dr. Love's writing, research, teaching, and educational advocacy work meet at the intersection of anti-racism, anti-blackness, carceral studies, education, abolition, and Black joy. In 2020, Dr. Love co-founded the Abolitionist Teaching Network (ATN) to develop and support teachers and parents to fight injustice within their schools and communities. She has also provided commentary for various news outlets including "NPR," "Ed Week," "The Guardian," and the "Atlanta Journal Constitution." She is the author of the book "We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom" (2019). A zoom link will be sent to registrants within 24 hours of the event or email virtualevents@sarahlawrence.edu.
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Wednesday April 28
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Join Dr. Christian Braneon, an urban climate expert and scientist at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York for a discussion on how the current moment offers a unique opportunity to imagine alternative futures in which policies, infrastructure, governance, and value systems are recalibrated with equity and sustainability at the center. Dr. Braneon will highlight some of the ways that Earth observations are being utilized to map the distribution of urban heat in cities and to understand the impacts of racist policies such as redlining. He will also offer perspectives on how a community-driven and justice-oriented approach can be employed to tackle related challenges such as environmental racism and health disparities. This event is a part of our series presented by "The Sarah Lawrence Interdisciplinary Collaborative on the Environment" and is open to the entire Sarah Lawrence community. A zoom link will be sent to registrants within 24 hours of the event or email virtualevents@sarahlawrence.edu.
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Friday April 30
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Join Dr. Michel Gelobter P'24 for a discussion on the history of climate justice as both a concept and a movement, particularly with respect to President Biden's administration and more comprehensive, youth-led actions. Acknowledging that climate justice is vital to how the climate problem will be shaped over the next 20 to 30 years, Dr. Gelobter will address what that path may look like and highlight some of the key uncertainties of the future. Dr. Gelobter co-founded the New York City Environmental Justice Alliance and led Redefining Progress, where he worked to design the world's most aggressive climate legislation, AB32-California's Global Warming Solutions Act. As an academic, Dr. Gelobter was the founding director of the Program on Environmental Policy at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. He is currently the CEO/Founder of Cooler, Inc., the first consumer-facing climate software company, and Managing Director of Reflective Earth, a non-profit devoted to slowing climate change by increasing the reflection of heat away from the Earth. This event is a part of our series presented by "The Sarah Lawrence Interdisciplinary Collaborative on the Environment" and is open to the entire Sarah Lawrence community. A zoom link will be sent to registrants within 24 hours of the event or email virtualevents@sarahlawrence.edu.
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Friday April 30
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Arietta Slade '73 Ph.D. is an internationally recognized theoretician, clinician, researcher, and teacher. Arietta is currently a Professor of Clinical Child Psychology at the Yale Child Study Center, and Professor Emerita in the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology at the City College of New York, and Co-Founder and Director of Training of Minding the Baby®, an interdisciplinary reflective home visiting program for high-risk mothers, infants, and their families at the Yale Child Study Center and School of Nursing. Arietta's lecture will center on reflective parenting, supporting the development of attachment and symbolization in young children and their caregivers. Reflective parenting is built on the foundations of safety (the absence of threat and fear), the capacity to regulate (quiet mind and body), and an openness and trust in relationships. This presentation will address ways that practitioners, educators, and communities can support parents in developing these foundations and so provide a safe and secure environment in which their children can flourish. Arietta has published widely on attachment, mentalization, and the early parent-child relationship. A zoom link will be sent to registrants within 24 hours of the event or email virtualevents@sarahlawrence.edu.
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Wednesday May 19
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Led by Gillian Adler, Literature Faculty, this seminar titled "Time and Literature: Fortune, Nostalgia, and the Pleasures of Forgetting in Medieval Texts" will be at 7:00 PM Easter Time. In the Middle Ages, people balanced a number of temporal systems, telling time by the sunrise and sunset, the planetary motions, the liturgical calendar, and - excitingly, by the fourteenth century - the mechanical clock. As the writings of Boethius and Chaucer demonstrate, medieval people also theorized about the passage of time and the nature of change through poetry and philosophy. Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy (c. 524) and Chaucer's  Book of the Duchess (c. 1368-1372) provide insight into the medieval temporal imagination, exploring the connections between grief, remembrance, and forgetting, as well as the interplay between time and eternity, at the heart of medieval religious and secular writings. This seminar will consider these concepts and situate them in relation to medieval categories of time, including the sacred hours and social tempos, as well as the subjective time of dreams and the apparently objective rhythms of mundane experience. The purpose here is to see, in brief, how these narratives can help us explore the age-old questions of human time. A zoom link will be sent to registrants within 24 hours of the event or email alum@sarahlawrence.edu.
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Our alumni programming is made possible with the support of donors. Please help Sarah Lawrence continue to offer unique programming and fulfill its mission to educate talented students by contributing today. $  
Event registration summary
Plastic Inheritance with Dr. Heather Davis:
Registrant(s)
0
$0.00
Climate Justice Faculty Panel:
Registrant(s)
0
$0.00
Grieving as an Act of Resistance with Dr. Cristina Rivera Garza:
Registrants
0
$0.00
Faculty @ Home: A Brief Introduction to Native American Literature with Arnold Krupat:
Recent Alumni (classes of 2006-2020)
0
$125.00
Alumni (classes of 2005 or earlier)
0
$200.00
Faculty on the Road: "The Lexicon of Migration" with Parthiban Muniandy:
Registrants
0
$0.00
CDI Longfellow Lecture: Abolitionist Teaching, Co-Conspirators & Educational Justice:
Registrants
0
$0.00
Integrating Environmental Justice into Climate Action with Dr. Christian Braneon:
Registrant(s)
0
$0.00
Climate Justice: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow with Dr. Michel Gelobter P'24:
Registrant(s)
0
$0.00
CDI Longfellow Lecture: The Relational Foundations of Reflection:
Registrant(s)
0
$0.00
Faculty on the Road: Time and Literature with Gillian Adler:
Registrants
0
$0.00
Donation:
$0.00
Total:
$
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